About

This blog is mainly about programming, graphics, hardware, maths, and that sort of thing.

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42 Responses to About

  1. Lukas says:

    Hi, Im just wonder that would be possible to run Nvidia Endless City demo on dx10 hardware? I know that dx10 doesn’t have tesselator at all, but if demo start with option with out tesselation as starting set?
    Could you think at this idea for a while?
    As I assume that will not be possible but if can be done ?
    Thanks
    Lots of hugs

    Lukas Teo

    • Scali says:

      It might be possible, if they don’t use any other DX11-specific hardware features other than tessellation. But I don’t really see the point, since it is a tessellation demo. Without tessellation, all that is left is some very lowpoly scenes that don’t look very good . Much like how Unigine Heaven looks ‘wrong’ without tessellation. I suggest you use Heaven or another DX9/DX10 benchmark to test performance between DX10 and DX11 cards.

  2. Jack Johnson says:

    Could u please also patch the alien vs triangles nvidia tech demo.exe ??.I want to run this on my 6970 as well.Thx 4 doin the endless city already.Looked awesome.

  3. CrabPerson says:

    Hi,

    Who are you. What’s your background? I’m curious and your About is surprisingly sparse. Great blog btw. And you seem to be one of the few rational ones communicating technology to the masses.

  4. Rick says:

    Hi Scali,

    I was wondering, what version of FreeBSD do you use currently?

    Thanks!

  5. Tizy says:

    Hi Scali,
    how did you fix the QuickTime SDK vs Windows 8 SDK header issues?
    Cheers!

    • Scali says:

      I just removed the offending stuff. There was a GetProcessInformation() function which I don’t use, so I removed that from the QuickTime header. And it redefined some 16-bit datatypes, int_fast16_t and uint_fast16_t or something like that. I removed those as well.

  6. Batman says:

    Hey when are you going to make any new articles i would like to hear what you think about Amd’s new steamroller as well as their presence in the console market.

  7. RMS says:

    Why do you keep deleting my comments? It’s because you’re wrong, Isn’t it? It’s okay, I understand bub, if I were an intel shill I’ld be pretty mad too

    • Scali says:

      Your posts keep getting marked as spam automatically because… you’re spamming my site with your childish fanboi rants.
      If you bothered to look around on this blog for the topics I’m discussing, you’d see that I’m far from an Intel shill. I discuss things like C64 and Amiga programming in-depth. That’s a MOS 6510 CPU and a Motorola 68000 CPU respectively. I’ve also done various blogs on ARM-based devices, including iPhones/iPads, Android devices and the GP2X.
      And today I’ve been spending some time with a Mac Mini G4, with a Motorola PowerPC CPU: http://youtu.be/eSLqAUyoCDk
      I’ve never liked Intel, or x86 in general. Get a clue.

  8. dila says:

    Hi Scali, this is a representative of #asm on EFnet.
    There is something going down this Halloween and your missing it.

  9. JadedLinuxUser says:

    Hi Scali, just want to ask a few questions.

    I have been using Linux for close to 7 years now and you did hit the nail on the head when you talked about how people who switched to Linux generally tended to do so because it was “different”. Now, after having to deal with 7 years of being different and using software which, while functional, looks completely dated and rough compared to their commercial counterparts, I think i have hit a point where the feeling of being jaded starts to set in for real; even my Surface tablet running Windows RT feels much sleeker and is more of a joy to use compared to my Linux notebook and desktop.

    Thing is, I am in a Computing course (though really it is more focused on in Info Sys side of things), and one of the reasons I’m very reluctant to drop Linux now is due to my belief that Linux is THE operating system on the backend such as servers much like Windows is THE operating system for client computing systems such as desktops and notebooks. And in the 7 years of using Linux as a desktop, I have learnt how to use the command line in ways which I think will be of use in being a Sys Admin (which happens to be my career plan). In addition, the growing popularity of Android (which is basically Linux without any of the GNU stuff) on mobile devices is another factor that still makes me think that end-user friendly Linux variants have a very real possibility of pushing Windows aside. Am I totally mistaken in this regard?

    And if I DO go back to Windows to enjoy a proper desktop OS, will I be losing out on career opportunities? Because right now my single biggest fear is that not using Linux full-time equates to losing everything i have learnt about Linux, regardless of how little or relevant it may be.

    Your reply is appreciated.

    • JadedLinuxUser says:

      By the way, I should also point out that the whole hype and attention over Steam on Linux, SteamOS and SteamBox have also contributed to my thinking that Windows does face a real, if not still insignificant, threat of being pushed out in favor of other operating systems, especially if one buys into the claims that notebook and desktop computing are on the way out.

      • Scali says:

        I don’t buy into that claim though. There’s only so much you can do on a phone or tablet. For serious work (or serious gaming?), you’ll still want a decent sized screen, a regular keyboard and mouse, a full-featured OS, and as much processing power as possible.
        So I think there will always be a good market for notebook and desktop computers.

        As I already said in my blog, I don’t see SteamOS/SteamBox as a serious threat, since there just aren’t that many games on it, and the few games that are available are no better than their Windows counterparts, so there is no reason to move from Windows to SteamOS. And as long as Windows remains the dominant gaming OS, developers will continue to develop their games for Windows. I don’t know if linux can ever overcome that chicken-and-egg problem. OS X never became a popular gaming OS either, and it has a lot more games available than linux does (and OS X also has more commercial/high quality applications available than linux).

    • Scali says:

      Well, I don’t see why you’d have to limit yourself to a single OS? I use Windows as my primary desktop OS, and I use FreeBSD as my primary server OS. But I do also use Windows Server occasionally, and I also do use a desktop on FreeBSD every now and then.
      Aside from that there are many other systems I use, or have used (such as the oldskool stuff I still do… C64, Amiga, MS-DOS…). In my experience it’s often like riding a bike. I’ve used those systems intensively for many years. If you pick them up again, many things will just come back to you, even if it’s been years.

      Personally I think not having any experience with a modern Windows OS may be a bigger problem in terms of career opportunities.

      As for Android… I don’t think it’s a very good OS. Apple’s iOS is more efficient and more userfriendly. Android only won out because it was a cheaper solution, with a lot more choice of hardware.
      Windows Phone is a serious threat now, since it combines efficiency and userfriendliness with affordable hardware. As you can see with Kitkat, Google is now trying to focus on getting Android to run better on systems with less RAM (512 mb) and slower CPUs (replacing Dalvik with the more efficient ART VM).

      • JadedLinuxUser says:

        “Personally I think not having any experience with a modern Windows OS may be a bigger problem in terms of career opportunities.”

        Even on the SysAdmin side?

        “I don’t buy into that claim though. There’s only so much you can do on a phone or tablet. For serious work (or serious gaming?), you’ll still want a decent sized screen, a regular keyboard and mouse, a full-featured OS, and as much processing power as possible.
        So I think there will always be a good market for notebook and desktop computers.”

        But therein lies the whole point of the issue. See, with my Surface RT, a microHDMI cable and a bluetooth keyboard, a tablet is essentially transformed into an impromptu workstation that is, for the most part, good for everything except gaming, 3D modelling and programming (and that’s only because RT doesn’t allow running any Win32 applications, or I would have put Visual Studio and ProLog on it already since i need them for an assignment). And with Haswell-powered tablets, it’s only going to get better from there.

        And while I do appreciate Windows, they are the ones getting kicked around in the tablet space, and for most people, a tablet + HDMI cable + bluetooth keyboard + bluetooth mouse = usable, lightweight, and fast enough device for work. Considering how low-profile Microsoft is in this area, it’s little wonder people like me start to wonder about its prospects. We all love full-powered systems with full-featured OSes, but the average user that makes up the lion’s share of the consumer market are not ‘us’.

        Also, i think you didn’t really answer one of my questions, but that’s due to me not exactly phrasing it properly. If you contend that not having proper Windows experience is going to be a handicap, what is the best way for a Windows desktop user to practice Linux administration in the absence of a Linux server to administer? Generally, my experience is that even when using Linux as a desktop, the need to use the command line for certain tasks (especially top, ls, chmod, chown, mkdir and grep) allows for killing two birds with one stone since some of the commands are, IMHO, very relevant in the SysAdmin space. But with client Windows, it’s really just…client Windows. At the very least, i don’t see how I can pick up some knowledge in Windows administration while just running a client version of Windows. Perhaps my Google-fu isn’t advanced enough?

      • Scali says:

        Even on the SysAdmin side?

        That depends on what kind of systems you want to administer. Especially in office situations, you’ll mostly find Windows workstations and Windows fileservers/domain controllers etc.
        And then there are many organizations who use both. Eg, it’s quite common to have UNIX-based systems for web servers and databases, while the office machines run on Windows.
        A good system administrator is not limited to a single OS.

        See, with my Surface RT, a microHDMI cable and a bluetooth keyboard, a tablet is essentially transformed into an impromptu workstation that is, for the most part, good for everything except gaming, 3D modelling and programming

        As you say, “for the most part”. Tablets can replace notebooks and desktops to a certain point, but I don’t think they’ll ever disappear entirely. They both have their own space in the market.

        And while I do appreciate Windows, they are the ones getting kicked around in the tablet space

        I wonder. Windows is the only tablet OS that offers a good desktop experience. Even on Windows RT you get the full Office suite.
        And now that Atoms are competing with ARM in terms of performance-per-watt, we will be seeing a lot more Windows 8.1 tablets, rather than Windows RT ones. Android and iOS can’t compete with that, they are far more limited.
        Besides, “Getting kicked around” is not correct. Windows was just late to market. But now they’re there, they’re a force to be reckoned with.

        If you contend that not having proper Windows experience is going to be a handicap, what is the best way for a Windows desktop user to practice Linux administration in the absence of a Linux server to administer?

        If you want a linux server, just get one 🙂
        In my case my FreeBSD server is just a cheap Asus barebone, which I run headless somewhere in the house. I either use Putty or Xming from a Windows box whenever I interface with it.
        And if it’s just for playing around, you could either make your system dual-boot to Windows and linux, or install one OS natively and install the other inside a virtual machine.

        Generally, my experience is that even when using Linux as a desktop, the need to use the command line for certain tasks (especially top, ls, chmod, chown, mkdir and grep) allows for killing two birds with one stone since some of the commands are, IMHO, very relevant in the SysAdmin space. But with client Windows, it’s really just…client Windows.

        I don’t agree with that. A commandline is just an interface. Knowing how to use a commandline does not imply that you know how to administer a system. In fact, there are lots of graphical or web-based tools to help you with system administration, so you don’t necessarily need to use the commandline. You just need to know which settings to use in the configuration etc.

        So it’s the same problem: if you only use the commandline for client stuff… it’s just client stuff.

      • JadedLinuxUser says:

        Also, if you tend to Google around, there are news everyday about governments, schools, private institutions and businesses all claiming to make the move to Linux for their computing needs to save costs; this most possibly implies both backend and client computing.

        Unless I’m just simply reading too much into this?

      • Scali says:

        That’s politics 🙂
        There are some organizations who have switched, and found out that the switch turned out to be a lot more costly, and cause a lot more problems than they anticipated. Some have even tried linux and switched back.
        For some it works, for some it doesn’t.
        Linux certainly is not going to completely replace Windows anytime soon, if ever.

      • Klimax says:

        @JadedLinuxUser:
        See Active Directory.

        Second see Powershell and commandline tools. You’ll find that there are plenty by Microsoft and that command line scripting is powerful too, its syntax is not best (can be hard and really dissimilar to many other systems as it is more BASIC-like), but it allows many tasks too.

        In fact Server 2012 has GUI on top of Powershell, so anything doable in GUI is doable in Powershell. (BTW: Powershell commands have built-in support for remoting…)
        http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee706585(v=vs.85).aspx
        http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/ff700227.aspx

      • Klimax says:

        @Scali “was just late to market.”
        Late or just missed sudden change in market… (TabletPC)

      • Scali says:

        Actually, the tablet PC was originally developed by Microsoft. It just didn’t take off at the time.

      • Klimax says:

        @Scali:
        I know. I just apparently wrote ambiguously, because that was what I meant.

  10. Elijah says:

    I am in no ways knowledgeable in any extent comparable to your knowledge, and have actually just stumbled upon your blog and am in the process of digesting it.

    There is this project called Litestep, it is a shell re-placer that was originally developed for windows exp and the 32-bit frame. Recently I stumbled upon the project and sadly it is in disrepair. It seems to have a problem as people try to port the various plugins and the code into the 64-bit. I am a huge fan of the shell as (after taking some time of getting used to) is an amazing improvement (in my personal experience).

    1) What are your thoughts on it?
    2) Would you be perhaps willing (I do understand your time and knowledge are of high value) to help the project to continue it into the 64 bit scene? (and maybe perhaps is it possible to convert the old themes with their plugins from 32bit-64bit, and if not possible just so they retaint their functionality.)

    Thank you for taking the time to respond. You have an amazing blog and I am quite enjoying learning many more things then when I stumble upon threads of fanboys ragining at each other and hurling “Facts™”

  11. polkfan says:

    Scali, Do you think OpenGL is already faster than Directx? I heard it was bloated by some programmers but what do you think?

    • Scali says:

      OpenGL develops more ‘gradually’. DirectX is usually only updated once every few years, often coinciding with the release of a new version of Windows.
      Generally it’s like this:
      When a new DirectX is released, it is cutting-edge, and is faster and/or more advanced than OpenGL at that time.
      Over time, extensions are developed for OpenGL to implement new features and catch up with DirectX.
      At some point in time, OpenGL may even overtake DirectX.
      But eventually a new version of DirectX is released, and it starts all over again.
      We will soon get DirectX 12, which will take multithreading and CPU-overhead to new levels. It will take quite a redesign of OpenGL to offer the same, so once DirectX 12 is released, it will probably remain superior to OpenGL for a while.
      At this point in time however, OpenGL is probably slightly faster than D3D11, if you use all the latest extensions and features.

  12. maraakate says:

    Hey I saw you posted something on pouet about GUS cards, can you drop me an email maybe we can work something out? 🙂

  13. SirPauly says:

    Hi Scali

    Sorry for being ignorant but can you offer the advantages of utilizing x64 Tessellation?

    • Scali says:

      x64 is an amplification factor, so it all depends on what your source geometry is like.

      • intux says:

        so basically, on a (relatively) large surface, it can be verry usefull, and increase quality a lot, and on small stuff (like hair) it’s basically way too much, is this correct?

      • Scali says:

        That’s what you want to hear, but perhaps you should think first…
        What if each strand of hair is modeled by a single polygon patch? Then subdividing it by a factor 64 isn’t all that crazy, especially when a head is close up to the screen.
        I don’t know how the hair is implemented exactly, but given how blocky it looks with factor 8 already, it probably isn’t far from a single patch per strand of hair.
        So these are ‘relatively large surfaces’.

  14. JD says:

    Scali,

    I’ve tried downloading some of your old demos, and discovered that NONE of the links to bohemiq.scali.eu.org are working. Not even the files made this year. Is something wrong with that site? And is there an alternate download location?

  15. JD says:

    I was going to download both versions of the Android demo.

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